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IL job injury lawyerIt is not uncommon for many people to travel for their jobs, regardless of the industry or line of work they are in. Employees often have to meet with business partners or clients face-to-face, even if they live in different states or countries. Depending on the work that needs to be done, a business trip can last a day, weeks, or even months. The potential for a workplace accident still exists, even if an employee is not on company grounds. If a worker is injured while on a business trip, he or she may still be entitled to workers’ comp benefits. However, the process of seeking workers’ compensation for a traveling employee can be slightly more complicated, so it is best to talk to a legal professional before filing any insurance claims.

Seeking Workers’ Compensation Benefits

It is important to distinguish the fine line between work-related and non-work-related injuries, especially while traveling for business. Injuries suffered while attending a dinner meeting with clients are usually covered. However, any injuries sustained while going out to eat when you are “off the clock” with a friend or family member who is in that town are probably not covered. Injuries sustained while sightseeing on your own are most likely not covered under worker’s comp insurance. Injuries that occur while you are on an airplane, in a car, on a train or staying in a hotel for work-related duties are typically covered. Regardless of the type of injury an employee sustains while on a business trip, he or she should take the following steps to protect his or her rights to compensation:

  • Report the accident: Regardless if you are injured at an office, a restaurant, or a hotel while out of town on business, report the incident to management personnel of the establishment.
  • Record information: Ask witnesses for their account of the incident, take pictures, and document what happened immediately. Relying on memory after an accident is not reliable, and workers’ compensation cases take time to resolve.
  • Seek medical attention: Seek professional medical care after an injury. Let your doctor know you were working at the time of the accident. Keep records of every medical visit.
  • Inform your supervisor: Let your supervisor or HR department know about your injury. They should send you a workers’ compensation claim form electronically or in person once you are back in the office.
  • Talk to a lawyer: If you are concerned about liability for your claim, it is best to speak to an attorney. You may have a valid workers’ comp claim in addition to a third-party claim against the negligent party responsible for causing your injury.

Contact a Wheaton Workers’ Compensation Lawyer

Workplace injuries can happen in offices or factories or even when an employee is traveling for his or her job. Even if an accident does not take place on a company’s property, a worker may be eligible for compensation if he or she was hurt while working at an offsite or out-of-state location. A skilled DuPage County workplace injury attorney at the Law Offices of David W. Clark, P.C. can assist you in recovering damages for your pain and suffering. To schedule a free consultation, call our office today at 630-665-5678.

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IL injury lawyerA hospice social worker is a certified medical social worker (MSW) who has had specific training in end-of-life care. In hospice care, the social worker plays an important role in assisting with a patient’s wishes for care. This may include directives like a Do Not Resuscitate (DNR) order, planning a funeral, suggesting grief counselors, and more. Sometimes the social worker simply provides a listening ear or an expression of sympathy. A hospice social worker’s compassion, support, and knowledge can greatly improve the experience of the patient and his or her family during a very emotional time. But what benefits does a hospice worker receive if they are injured on the job?

Types of Injuries

Many hospice social workers travel to nursing homes, hospitals, assisted living facilities, and even patients’ homes to perform their jobs. They typically use their own vehicles for transportation to and from sites, but this travel time is usually considered part of their workday. Inclement weather can sometimes put them at risk for car accidents due to icy or snowy road conditions, traveling in all kinds of weather, rain or shine. Distracted drivers on the roadway can also cause crashes or rear-end collisions.

Since a hospice social worker often enters patients’ homes, the potential for possible injury can occur there, too. For example, if the social worker trips on stairs, obstacles, or an uneven walkway in or around the house or facility. Slip and falls could also take place due to water or ice on the pavement. The social worker could also sustain a back or neck injury if he or she tries to help a nurse or family member transfer a patient from a chair to a bed.

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b2ap3_thumbnail_work-related.jpgWorkers’ compensation claims can cover work-related injuries for a wide variety of reasons. Injuries at work will often qualify you to receive compensation and benefits, so it is vital to understand the background on workers’ compensation claims in Illinois. Using these statistics to have a discussion with your personal injury lawyer about the best course of action for your case will be beneficial to all who need to file a workers’ compensation claim.

The Illinois Workers’ Compensation Commission releases a report on the workers’ compensation claims and the results of those claims filed in Illinois every year. The report filed in 2017 for injuries occurring in 2016 states that there were just over 200,000 instances of workers reporting injuries to their employers in Illinois during 2016, with 45,000 claims filed by the employees to the worker’s compensation commission. Here are some of the key takeaways from that report.

Most Common Reasons for On-The-Job Injuries

The commission’s report states that overexertion and bodily reaction are the most common cause of work-related injuries by a wide margin. The five most common reasons below overexertion are: slip and falls, vehicle collisions, workplace violence, being exposed to dangerous substances or conditions, or contact with a part of the equipment or an object.

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