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IL work injury lawyerThere are many different occupations throughout the United States in various types of industries. Some jobs are inherently more dangerous than others. For example, a construction worker or warehouse employee may be exposed to certain hazardous conditions in the field, while a librarian most likely does not encounter dangers in a typical workday. Accidents can happen, and depending on the circumstances, they can result in minor to serious injuries. In some cases, a victim may require surgery or significant rehabilitation to recover. Thankfully, employees in Illinois can seek relief from their employer through a workers’ compensation claim.

The Road to Recovery Can Be Long

Many injuries to the body can require physical rehabilitation. If an injury or medical condition suffered on the job has limited a person’s ability to function on a daily basis, he or she may need physical therapy. This type of therapy can relieve pain, restore range of motion, and improve muscle tone, strength, endurance, and balance. By using a combination of heat and cold, ultrasound, laser therapy, exercise, and more, an individual may gain full recovery of his or her injured body part. Studies have shown that the sooner a victim starts physical therapy, the better the outcome.

Some of the most common workplace accidents can result in the following types of injuries that may require rehab to mend:

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IL disability attorneyThere are numerous occupations that involve physical labor. For some employees, this may involve lifting or moving heavy objects. Other jobs may not involve using the whole body, but rather require repetitive motion of certain body parts. Years of continuously using the same muscles and joints can lead to problems. Carpal tunnel syndrome is a condition that causes tingling, numbness, and weakness in the hand. It is also known as median nerve compression. Even employees who work in different industries may still suffer from this type of work injury. In some cases, carpal tunnel syndrome can lead to a workers’ compensation claim.

Signs and Symptoms

The median nerve runs the length of a person’s arm. Carpal tunnel syndrome occurs when pressure on that nerve goes through a passage in the wrist called the carpal tunnel and ends in the hand. The median controls feeling and movement of the thumb and all the fingers except the pinky.

One of the first symptoms that a person who has carpal tunnel syndrome may experience is the feeling that his or her hand has “fallen asleep.” This numbing sensation can go all the way up the arm. In some cases, an individual may have flare-ups when holding that requires the wrist to bend, such as holding a book or steering wheel. Below are possible signs that someone might have this syndrome:

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IL work injury lawyerWorking at or owning a restaurant can be a very rewarding career. Whether someone is a hostess, server, chef, or manager, this can be a fast-paced and exciting job. However, like in other industries, there is the possibility of accidents with injuries. These can range from minor to serious and even fatal. In Illinois, the Workers’ Compensation Commission resolves disputes between employees and employers for injuries and illnesses that are sustained on the job. This is a no-fault insurance benefits program that most companies are required to carry. In some cases, a workers’ compensation claim may provide financial relief to an injured or disabled worker.

Typical Accidents at Food Establishments

Restaurants may consist of a large staff that performs many different jobs. Regardless of the type of food being served, most kitchens’ food preparation involves cutting, chopping, sauteing, baking, in addition to cleaning. This work environment can be prone to certain types of accidents and injuries, including but not limited to the following:

  • Punctures and Lacerations: Due to frequent use of knives or cutting machines as well as broken dishes or glassware, restaurant staff members may suffer cuts or deep puncture wounds.
  • Burns: From boiling water to fryers and gas stovetops, heat and water burns can also cause a significant hazard for restaurant workers. Depending on the situation, a worker can suffer first-, second-, or third-degree burns.
  • Back and neck injuries: If an item such as a large canned good is stacked too high could fall on an employee, inflicting damage on the spinal cord, neck, or even causing head trauma. These kinds of injuries are also common when doing repetitive motion, often found in large-scale or fast-food establishments.
  • Sprains and strains: Product or inventory that is misplaced or on hard-to-reach shelves can cause worker injury due to overreaching. Employees can also slip and fall on liquid or other debris in the aisles or kitchen area, which often result in sprained ankles. Restaurant workers can also suffer from strains when they are lifting heavy boxes or bags.
  • Eye damage: Grease that splatters from a grill can hit a worker’s face and go into his or her eyes. In addition, toxic cleaning solutions or chemicals typically used in foodservice environments can also lead to blindness.
  • Electrocutions: Some older restaurants or diners may have faulty or makeshift wiring for their appliances or damaged/worn electrical cords. If there is standing water due to spills, it can lead to an employee being electrocuted.

Workers’ Compensation Claim

Filing a workers’ compensation claim can help restaurant industry employees by covering fees related to work-related injuries, medical bills, and lost wages. If a restaurant is robbed and a worker gets hurt during the commission of the crime, his or her injuries may also be covered under workers’ comp. In order to receive benefits, an injured employee must notify his or her employer of the accident that caused the injury at work. This notification can be given in writing or verbally 45 days of the date of the injury.

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Il job injury lawyerRegardless of the occupation or the industry, workplace accidents can occur anytime. In some cases, an employee can suffer a debilitating or even fatal injury. According to the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics, a total of 5,250 workers died from work-related injuries in the United States in 2018. In Illinois, most companies are required to carry workers’ compensation insurance for their employees in case they get hurt on the job. The Illinois Workers’ Compensation Act covers all injuries that are caused by the employee’s work, including pre-existing conditions that are aggravated by the worker’s job. If you or your loved one was seriously injured, you may not be able to return to your previous job or salary. Consulting with a knowledgeable workers’ comp attorney is essential so you understand your rights to benefits.

What Does a Reduction of Earning Capacity Mean?

Lost earning capacity refers to a decrease in an individual’s ability to earn his or her income. It is also referred to as future loss of earnings or impairment of earning power. Different from lost income or wages, which is generally a designated amount of time, lost earning capacity involves a worker’s future earning potential. Reduced earning capacity is the difference between what an employee was able to earn over the course of his or her life prior to the accident compared to the lower amount he or she is now capable of earning due to his or her injuries.

To establish a loss of earning capacity, an employee must demonstrate (with a degree of certainty) his or her earning capacity before the injury and how that capacity was diminished by the injury. This involves providing evidence of losses, which will vary based on the circumstances of the case.

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IL work injury lawyerFrom time to time, everyone can get sick. However, if it is more than just a common cold, a person may need to seek medical attention. In some cases, a work environment may be the reason for an employee falling ill. An occupational disease is defined as an illness or harmful condition that is directly caused by job duties or is aggravated by hazardous conditions in the workplace. These dangerous conditions are not common to the general public. Depending on the industry, protective gear or safety precautions must be followed at all times. If these safety measures are not taken by an employer, a worker may be at risk of suffering from a serious illness or life-threatening disease. It is important to understand how workers’ compensation laws apply to these illnesses if they are caused by employment in the healthcare field.

Diseases and Illnesses Common to the Medical Profession

Healthcare workers face a wide variety of hazards on the job, including harmful exposures to chemicals, drugs, and radiation. In addition, doctors, nurses, and administrative staff can be exposed to many germs on a daily basis. Many viruses or infections are transmitted through the air in healthcare facilities.

Some of the infectious diseases for which employees in the medical field are most at risk include:

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